Apple rejecting games for screenshots depicting guns or violence

News / Mobile phones

Apple rejecting games for screenshots depicting guns or violence

  • 2015-02-13 15:07:41
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News / Mobile phones Apple rejecting games for screenshots depicting guns or violence

Pocket Gamer reports that according to multiple developers Apple’s App Review team has been rejecting games and updates, which include screenshots that depict violence such as people holding guns, being maimed or killed.

This is forcing developers to either remove such screenshots or even blur the image to hide the guns or things that could depict violence. As Pocket Gamer points out, Splash Damage, developers of Tempo, which was chosen as Editor’s Choice by Apple, had to blur the guns to hide them from the screenshot.

Similarly, Team Choas, developer of Rooster Teeth vs. Zombiens had to change their icon, because in the original icon the hero was holding an NES Zapper gun.

Rooster Teeth vs. Zombiens

Marco Arment, developer of Instapaper and Overcast, points out that this is not a new rule. According to App Store guidelines all app metadata such as title, description, icon and screenshots have to adhere to 4+ age rating.

The App Store has parental controls and requires all apps to bear age-appropriate content ratings. While violence, etc. has always been permitted in apps, Apple has always required that all app metadata — title, description, icon, and screenshots — be kid-proof with the lowest rating.

Here’s clause 3.6 from Apple’s App Store guidelines:

Apps with App icons, screenshots, and previews that do not adhere to the 4+ age rating will be rejected

So it looks like Apple has started enforcing the guideline a lot more stringently. But Jim Dalrymple of The Loop, reports that he spoke to Apple about this today, and he was told that “the company is being a lot more liberal lately with what it allows in the App Store for images and screenshots.”

It seems like a reasonable requirement because the App Store is accessible by people of all ages, but the problem seems to be inconsistency in enforcement.

[via PocketGamer]

Categories: Mobile phones

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